Blog Archives

Algorithmic Trading in a Data-full World

By Jen Burns in Big Data, Cartoons, Featured, Personalization on April 16, 2014

blog image

Algorithmic trading in the stock market moves millions of shares by breaking up the big buy/sell orders into a series of smaller ones. Yet, on the flip side, algorithmic trading is also used to sew smaller orders together to make bigger moves all at once. Kevin Slavin mentioned this in his 2011 Ted Talk.

A Personalization Manifesto – Personalize Based On User Type Part II of III

By Dan Darnell in Featured, Personalization on May 21, 2013

blog image

Before any real personalization can happen, a retailer needs to first ask, how well do I know this shopper?  In most cases, the shopper will be an unknown or anonymous visitor.  These are users that you have never seen before or that you do not recognize. Using in the moment context and intent is the best ... Read More »

Algorithms, Merchandising and Psychology – Part 2

By Robin Morris in A Word from the Engineers, Featured on May 9, 2013

blog image

In my last post, we discussed the recommendation algorithm, the merchandizing layer and the presentation layer as well as the fact that I am working on a KPI-optimizing algorithm that differs from a collaborative filtering algorithm. In running A/B tests on these differing approaches, we’ve found that the sites divide into two types. Type 1: ... Read More »

Algorithms, Merchandising and Psychology - Part 1

By Robin Morris in A Word from the Engineers, Featured on May 7, 2013

blog image

I was going to write this blog about feature hashing, a massively useful trick when building classifiers and predictive models.  It saves the time and complexity of building a dictionary and allows the hashed feature vector to be smaller than the number of possible features.  It is smaller because the number of actual features in a particular data set is often much ... Read More »

The Numbers Don’t Lie, or Do They?

By Marti Tedesco in eCommerce, Events on March 7, 2013

blog image

Personally, I love David Brooks. His op-ed articles and book The Social Animal display a thoughtfulness and intellect that goes beyond most editorialists these days. His recent New York Times article What Data Can’t Do (February 18, 2013) seems like it could have been written by a Baynote data scientist. In particular, Brooks mentions the fact that “Data obscures values… data is ... Read More »